Recent phishing/scam email examples

By Catherine Haug, January 15, 2017

I the last week I’ve gotten several phishing/scam emails, so I thought I’d share them with you to help you know how to recognize them.

Phishing is fishing for private information such as usernames, passwords and credit card accounts. Wikipedia (1) defines it as:

“the attempt to obtain sensitive information such as usernames, passwords, and credit card details (and, indirectly, money), often for malicious reasons, by disguising as a trustworthy entity in an electronic communication.”

A scam is “fraudulent scheme performed by a dishonest individual, group, or company in an attempt obtain money or something else of value” according to the Business Dictionary (2).

The examples below appear to be from the trusted businesses: FedEx and USPS. But if you look at the sender’s email address, you can tell the sender is pretending, in an attempt to gain your trust and get your information.

Example 1 (screen capture below):

It wants me to click on the View messages button, but I’m suspicious, so If Iclick on the apparent sender (highlighted in blue), I get:

“crickn827 (at) amega (dot) com”.

If it were truly from FedEx, the text after the @ would indicate: (at) fedex (dot) com (email addresses disguised for security). I put this email in my junk folder so I could shred it.

Example 2 (screen-capture below):

It wants me to open the attached zip file (below the email’s text), but I’m suspicious, so If Iclick on the apparent sender (“USPS Ground”) and the “Reply To” fields, I get after the @:

“(at) leonardoarroyo (dot) com.”

If it were really from USPS, the part after the @ would be “@ usps (dot) com” (email addresses disguised for security). Like the previous example, I put this email in my junk folder so I could shred it.

(ignore the “change size of message area” message superimposed over the email screen cap by my computer).

 

 

References

  1. Wikipedia on phishing: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phishing
  2. Business Dictionary on ‘scam’: businessdictionary.com/definition/scam.html

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